companion

Easy Edible Landscaping

Why everyone doesn’t have an edible garden, I don’t know. Perhaps it’s because they have husbands, similar to mine, who feel vegetables belong in the vegetable garden, herbs belong in the herb garden, fruit trees lined up in neat rows, orchard style out back, and well, you get the point. Everything has its place. Much like his tools (a lesson my son is still trying to master).

However, I’m the creative type who likes to think outside the box. Okay, “like” is a relative term here. I think outside of the box, period. “Box?” my brain asks. “What box? I don’t see any box around my head.”

You get the point. I’m odd that way, but that oddity tends to lend itself to GREAT ideas. Awesome! Like my homemade herb sachet for the dryer, and my wonderfully tasty rosemary lemonade. Basil lemon ice chips, anyone? Oven-sundried tomatoes? Why not? There are a ton of creative things you can do with your vegetables and one of my favorites is edible landscaping. I mean, why banish the vegetables to a faraway garden where you have to trot off to collect every meal? Why not place it right outside your door? We are a convenience-oriented society these days. Makes sense to keep your herbs and veggies close.

Besides, vegetable plants are simply beautiful. Take this gorgeous cabbage. It looks more like a flower than a head of chow.

Red cabbage

And I don’t know about you, but grazing a bushy basil or rosemary plant garnering a whiff of scent in the process is sheer decadence.

rosemary hedge

Below your rosemary hedge, lettuce would make a lovely addition.

Tami's gorgeous lettuce

What about corn? These fellas grow to be six-foot tall? Why not plant them for a summer hedge around your backyard? You’re going to be spending more time outdoors, anyway. Makes sense to add a bit of privacy. Me? I live in Florida which means I can grow these beauties fall AND spring.

Cody the garden dog

Now that you’ve got the hang of it, maybe a lovely squash border near your corn?

school squash and corn

The two are wonderfully friendly, as in companion planting perfection. Really, when you get down to it, there are all kinds of options for edible landscaping. From year-round herbs to seasonal fruits and vegetables, your plants can provide dual benefits.

However, if you decide to incorporate an edible garden into your landscape, be sure you’re not the only one who knows about your new endeavor. If you are, you may emerge from your home with the same great disappointment as I did one sunny afternoon. My husband sprayed my bright tender greens with insecticide. Seems he thought the little gems were weeds and not a salad garden in the making. But it’s not his fault. I didn’t label the area as “edible landscape” in progress, nor did I advise him to stay clear: organic only. Lesson learned.

Come fall, I’m looking forward to a fresh try at edible landscaping. Why not try it for yourself? No lawn? No worries! Move those silly flowers from their boxes and replace them with bean blossoms!

beautiful pole bean blossom

Works for me. 🙂

How to Grow Okra

It’s summer which means okra around these parts. This veggie loves warm weather and is the perfect plant to grow in Florida. From March through September, you’ll find okra in my garden. I start these plants from seed. in ground. about 1/2 – 3/4” deep, then stand back and watch them grow. It’s almost that easy.

clemson spineless okra

In about a week or so you’ll see the first leaves popping up through the soil. Okra cab grow several feet in height so be sure to give them plenty of space when planting, about 12-18” apart. More