Sweet Peas A Bloomin’

My sweet peas are blooming and are oh-so-gorgeous, not to mention tasty. Tall and bushy, each plant produces so many pods, I should be serving them with every meal!

sweet peas ready for picking

Unfortunately for my family members, these beauties never make it to the house. These are my garden snacks. Freshly-plucked from the vine, sweet peas are delicious. I’d plant three beds of them, if I thought I could eat them all!

And sweet peas are easy to grow. They need little water, low nutrients–especially when planted in a base of my organic compost–and are cold tolerant. However, there is one problem when growing these plants. They grow high and heavy.


Poor babies. Despite three rows of twine run between stakes, they’re still slumping over, bending their healthy vines perilously close to the breaking point. Luckily for me, I have more twine and can solve this problem easily. I simply ran another twine from the top of each stake, end-to-end, at a height of about four feet. Whew!

sweet peas with solid high support

It might not look beautiful, but this setup works. For added support, I placed bamboo stakes along the twine, weaving them between the levels of twine to keep my support sturdy and steady. It works!

It’s Not Too Late

Just because January 1st has come and gone, that’s no reason you can’t make a New Year’s resolution to start that compost pile you’ve always wanted. There’s nothing to it, other than a trip outside. Really. No turning, twisting, flipping over raking–unless you want to. And it doesn’t stink, despite what you’ve heard. This is where Mother Nature is your friend. You’re very best friend.

backyard compost pile

All that’s required is desire and effort you’re already making. Raking leaves? Dump them onto the compost pile out back. Tossing out leftover food? Toss it onto the compost pile. Want to recycle those paper towels, napkins, and newspapers? Place them on the compost pile instead of the recycle bin. All of these items work perfectly and produce excellent, non-toxic organic results.

compost cross-section

And the dirt you’ll reap from your efforts is superior to anything else for your garden soil. And it’s free! Of course, if you don’t have a backyard, you can always buy one of those handy-dandy contraptions to hold your compost.

black gold compost

They do work and with excellent results. For your kitchen, you can make a cute compost bin to hold your kitchen leftovers until you’re ready to make the trek outside, complete with carbon filter hidden in the lid to absorb the smell. Unlike your outdoor compost pile, your indoor compost bin WILL stink. Bad.

kitchen scraps get covered

My kids painted this one at one of those clay-glaze places, although we’ve since changed over to a simple stainless steel version. Less breakable (hint, hint). So what are you waiting for? Start resolving and get composting!

Your garden will thank you.

Have You Planted Potatoes, Yet?

I have and they’re going gangbusters. Just look at those gorgeous girls!

potato beds in early January

Yes, those are vacant spots in my row. Apparently, some of the gals haven’t sprouted, yet. Seems they’re taking their sweet time to emerge from the soil. Could be the weather. Could be my watering schedule. Could simply be a matter of nature. Not everyone grows at the same rate, you know.

There’s also the possibility of “theft by animal.” A few mornings, I awoke to find deep tracks through my garden. Wild hogs, armadillos, raccoons… I’m not sure who has been visiting me, only that somebody has.

Ugh. Living with nature is a beautiful thing, up to a point. But I will turn my positive attitude cap around and look on the bright side: I can always refill my bed with new potato sprouts. Besides, wild animals have to eat too, right?

mulch potato plants

Of course they do. I simply wish they’d chomp elsewhere. Now, back to my potatoes. I’ve planted them in a nice organic mix of compost from my backyard pile (shown below) and composted cow manure and have mulched them well. Mulch provides the moisture retention potatoes need, as well as encourages them in their upward growth habit. For complete details on how-to grow potatoes, check my How-To section.

Compost gold


I have one bed of red potatoes and one bed of white. Different size, different flavor–variety is the spice of life! And in about 2-3 months, I’ll be reaping my first gems from the ground. Can’t wait!

Shopping Season Begins

It’s time to buy your seeds!  If you haven’t been seed saving, that is.  Personally, I have beans coming out the wa-zoo which means I won’t be purchasing any of these babies. But I will be looking for some fresh bibb lettuce. While I know how to harvest lettuce seeds for seed-saving, I haven’t been making the time. Call me lazy, call me too eager for the next harvest, I’ve pulled most of my plants before they had a chance to flower (like this lovely lady below). Seeds will form in the flowers, whereby you can remove from the plant, hang it to dry in a bag making collecting the tiny seeds easy.

lettuce going to seed

Now, for those of you who are trying to save seeds, I completely understand how you could become so excited over your tomato crop making sauce–ketchup, salads, even canning the beauties–that you completely forgot to save a few ripe tomatoes for the purpose of saving seeds.  Yep. You plopped them right into the boiling water for skin removal without even thinking.  It happens.  It’s okay.  More Beefsteak tomato seeds are on my list, too. I mean, these guys are gorgeous, I can’t get enough of them!

seed shopping

But take heart.  You’re enjoying the thrill of gardening, reaping what you sow and cooking the dickens out of it.  Which is all good. However, keep in mind that when those seed catalogs arrive and you eagerly run to the mailbox (or jog), be careful. Ice tends to be slippery. You don’t want to break a hip or bruise a wrist–you’re going to need those limbs in good condition to begin the season!

Now, once you’re settled indoors, snug as a bug in a rug in front of a warm fire, pull out those gorgeous catalog pages filled with plump ripe fruits and vegetables, a colorful array of flowers and herbs, and look for heirloom seeds.  Not hybrid, not super-duper-extra-sweet or double the normal growth potential…

Uh, uh.  You want heirloom, preferably organic.  Why?

my salsa tomatoes

Because once you plant those hybrid seeds, the ones meant to overcome Mother Nature’s deficiencies (though don’t let her hear you say that out loud), you’ll be sorely disappointed next season when the seeds you saved don’t produce.  Hybrids aren’t natural and when you replant the seeds, your new crop of plants will not reproduce the original fruit, if they germinate at all.  Hybrid Better Boys will yield a bounty of produce, but next season?  These bad boys might only yield a crop of cherry-like tomatoes.  Se pasa. It happens.

So save yourself the heartache and only buy heirloom seeds.  And while you’re shopping, remember to only buy what you’ll actually eat. Otherwise you’ll end up with a rotted mess of unwanted produce. Plant seeds according to package instructions and keep moist.  Think of them as babies and treat them as such.

This spring I’m tripling my corn beds. Now that I know how to control those dastardly insects, I think I can reap a golden harvest this year. I’ll keep you posted. Until then…happy gardening!

Starting Strong (And Curried!)

Like everyone else, I’m “cleansing” this month. I’ve dropped the libations and decadent sweets–

What? You’re NOT cleansing the body of toxins this month?

Oh, wow, you must be one of those who doesn’t let it slip during the holiday season. You walk by the dessert table without blinking, pass on the wine and champagne, and don’t miss a single day of exercise. Not me. Unfortunately, the dessert table shouts my name as I walk by–occasionally grabbing my arm and chaining me close until I over-indulge. The bottle of bubbly whispers my name, winks, then insists I should celebrate with another glass of its delightful contents! And exercise? Who has the time?! I’m at the mall, at the office, the party–I don’t have time for walking, biking and dancing.

Oh–wait a minute. Dancing? I always have time for dancing! Maybe I DID exercise after all!! **sigh** Guess I fall prey to whim. But it’s probably because I know January will soon roll around, and I can hit the reset button. And have. Just look at this delicious breakfast I prepared this morning!

Curry Spinach Chickpea Egg Scramble

Spinach and chickpeas sautéed in olive oil with a few dashes of garlic and curry powder, plus a healthy dose of pepper. (Sautéed fresh garlic would have worked, too.) Add one egg over easy and you have yourself one healthy meal to start the day. Yum. I could have eaten two servings, but then again, I’m “cleansing” the recent addition of five pounds to my midsection and can’t afford the extra calories. Good thing I still have lunch to look forward to!

I only wish my garden spinach was growing well enough to have included it in the pan, but alas, Florida has been much too hot this winter for spinach. How about you? Any resolutions or dishes you’d like to share?

Mixed Kernels

It’s a sad day when you harvest your corn–the one cob you’ve been watching and waiting for the silks to turn brown–only to discover you have missing kernels when you peel back the husk. It’s like, your cob was forming, doing a great job, and *poof* suddenly became too tired to finish the job.

corn missing kernels

Hmph. It’s a disappointment, to be sure. Most likely occurred during pollination, or the lack thereof. If you planted your corn in one single row, pollination can be tricky. I mean, there’s a reason those commercial growers plant all those corn plants so close together–proximity packs a more powerful pollination! It’s power in numbers when it comes to wind, too. Corn is very susceptible to wind, and tends to be blown over at the first kiss of a summer breeze.

corn by storm

Missing kernels can also be caused by poor watering/feeding during pollination. Corn is a heavy feeder, and if you don’t give it what it needs when it needs it, well, you know… It kind of poops out on you. It happens. But I’m here to tell you, chin up, friendly gardener. It’s not the end of the world. So what if you can’t serve perfectly-formed cobs of corn to your family and friends, you can do one better (or different!). Roast them!

That’s right. Wipe those tears away and listen up. You’re going to scrape those beautiful kernels from the cob, toss them in a bowl with olive oil, salt and pepper, a little parsley and heck, while we’re at it, a sliced jalapeno pepper (mine was red) and roast those babies. Ta-da! You’ve made lemonade from your lemons.

roasted corn

I preheated the broiler to high, spread my mixture on a cookie sheet lined with nonstick foil, and then spread the corn mixture out in a single layer. Cooking time was about 15 minutes, with me turning the corn mixture once or twice during the process for even browning. Just keep an eye on them and roast to YOUR idea of perfection.

The flavor was divine; a wonderfully sweet corn flavor with a hint of popcorn that results in a belly full of pride and pleasure. YUM. I served mine with some garden broccoli and a filet of plank-roasted salmon for a fabulous weeknight dinner. The family was pleased!

Now it’s your turn. Enjoy!

Christmas in the Garden

Gardeners are nature lovers at heart, and probably healthy, too. But interior designers with a creative flair that rivals Martha Stewart? Oh, wait. She’s a gardener AND an interior designer whiz. Huh. Bad analogy. But you see where I’m going with this–who says gardeners can’t transform their love of gardening into gorgeous home décor?

No one. No one on this blog, anyway. I mean, is this wreath the most beautiful thing you’ve ever seen?

carrot wreath

I think so. And immediately my mind starts improvising–why not radishes? Garlic? Except for the small fact that my garlic won’t be mature until May-June, I think it would make an excellent wreath adornment. Don’t you? For complete how-to instructions for this carrot gem, head on over to HGTV. Those folks are incredible! I’m sure you’ll find a ton of things to create for your home.

But if you’re not into the DIY, how about an old classic?


Rosemary plants make for great Christmas décor and they smell good. Love it!

Looking for a few gifts for those gardeners in your life? Personally, I’d enjoy receiving this crafty invention. Got herbs? Water?

Flavor infuser wtaer bottle

Let the hydration begin!

I mean, whoever thought up the idea for a “flavor infuser water bottle” has my vote for Gift of the Year. Fabulous! Find it and more at Uncommon Goods. While you’re there, check out the Garden in a Can set–definitely fun for the beginner gardeners in your life. When it comes to young gardeners, Show Me The Green! makes a great gift for the elementary readers poking about the veggie plants.

Venetta, Dianne- Show Me the Green! (RGB)

Not only fun, but this fiction book set in and around an organic garden is informative and can inspire even the most urban among us to head outside and get digging. Book #2 centers on a school garden and is set for release spring 2016. Check out the website for full details.

Have any favorites of your own? Do share and Merry Christmas!


The Verdict Is In…

I’ve been struggling with growing corn. Between the bugs and the food and water, my corn has not been happy with me. But no more. While it might not be the biggest cob of corn, it certainly is the most beautiful.

No worms, no black spots–not even missing kernels. Nope, this cob of corn is perfect! Sure, it’s somewhat on the small size, but I’m 100% organic and you’ll find no super-growth nutrient mixes in my soil which I’m convinced must be part of the issue with regard to size. That, and natural soil composition. I don’t know what California is made of, but they’ve got seriously good dirt. All the produce I’ve ever seen from California is HUGE. Ginormous. And delicious!

But I live in Florida and must make do with what I have. And right now, I’m feeling pretty good.

How did I do it? Liquid seaweed and fish emulsion fertilizer, plus a healthy blow of Dipel Dust. The worms are the worst offenders, followed by the grasshoppers/leaf hoppers. How about you? Any success stories to share?

Don’t Think Tomatoes Are Supposed To Look Like This

I’m no expert, but I’m pretty sure my tomatoes are not supposed to have…to have… I’m not sure what the heck to call it! A deformation? An odd lump? Whatever it is, I know it’s not right. But is it still edible?

Beefsteak tomato anomaly

That’s the question inquiring minds want to ask! I mean, I’m growing these beefsteak beauties to eat them, say, with my homemade pesto.

tomatoes and homemade pesto

Hm. Doesn’t that look good? It’s a mix of your standard Genovese basil with the addition of Dark Opal. I don’t find the Opal as intensely flavorful as the Genovese, but I do love the addition of color. Now, as soon as the garlic in my garden is ready for harvest, I’ll be able to make this pesto entirely from scratch! (Except for the olive oil and cheese, of course.)

garlic under cover

Currently, my garlic is under screen cover due to the unnaturally high temps here in Florida. Garlic can be sensitive that way. Heat and solid sunshine is great for the beach, but bad for garlic. No worries, they’ll survive. As will my tender sweet onions…

sweet onions are in!

Just planted, I want to make certain they get a strong start and stay moist so I haven’t added mulch yet. This way, I can keep a clear eye on them and will watch them for about a week before adding mulch. Nothing more than a personal preference on my part. I’m sure they’d enjoy the ground cover.

corn is faring well

Elsewhere in the garden, my corn is thriving, as is my lettuce. From now until May, I won’t have to get my salad leaves from the store–I’ll pluck them from my backyard! What’s NOT faring so well are some of my tomato plants.

tomato leaf curl

Leaf curl. Ugh. It could have been caused by whiteflies. It could have been caused by weather stress. Either is plausible, especially considering the heat wave we’ve been having. At this point, I’ll remove it and move on. Not that the plant can’t produce–it can–but it can also infect those around it. Remember, I’m growing these babies with culinary intentions!

tomato pesto salad

Now, off to enjoy my lunch. 🙂

Forget Pumpkins–Fall Means Garlic!

While I adore all things pumpkin this time of year, I love growing garlic and October is the month to begin. You can purchase garlic online via a variety of seed growers, though I get mine from my local seed and feed. Gotta support my community, right? Better yet, I can choose the bulbs I think look best and not lacking in any way. One of the issues with garlic is fungal disease–another reason I like to eyeball my bulbs before purchase.

One thing to keep in mind when growing garlic is that these babies take time, and lots of it. Like sweet onions, I plant garlic in the fall and harvest the following summer. By my count, that’s about six months. UGH. Tough when you’re the gardener excited about growing and harvesting your garlic.

line of garlic

But once you make the decision and commit, you’ll be glad you did. Homegrown garlic is worth the wait. Here in Florida, I plant my bulbs in October, after I pre-soak them overnight in a baking soda-vinegar solution to prevent fungal diseases, about 1 TBSP of each per gallon of water. Some suggest the addition of liquid seaweed to the solution to encourage root growth, though I usually wait and use the seaweed to fertilize them once in the ground.

As with most vegetables in the garden, garlic prefers an organic-rich well-drained soil. If you live where it freezes, you’ll plant your bulbs in fall and mulch well, protecting the garlic and encouraging worms to hibernate with your bulbs. More